Colorado

Round two of candidate finance reports

Wide gaps in dollars raised by school board candidates in Denver, Douglas and Jefferson counties appear little changed in a second round of campaign finance reports filed with the Secretary of State’s Office on Friday.

In Denver, at-large candidate Happy Haynes is edging closer to a new fundraising record, reporting a total of $230,037 raised as of Oct. 23 in her quest to fill the citywide seat being vacated by Theresa Peña, who is term-limited.

Haynes, a former Denver City Council president and school district administrator, still has one more reporting period for the current election, covering Oct. 24 through Nov. 26. That third and final report, due Dec. 1, could show Haynes surpassing the $240,605 record set by at-large candidate Mary Seawell in 2009.

Friday’s filings cover the past three weeks, from Oct. 7 to Oct. 23, and show the nine candidates for three Denver school board seats raised a combined total of $133,982 during that time. Altogether, the candidates have raised nearly $790,000 so far in their campaigns to govern the city school district.

More than half of that money is coming in for just three candidates – Haynes, Anne Rowe and Jennifer Draper Carson. Each has raised more than twice the total of her nearest competitor.

For example, among Haynes’ four opponents for the at-large seat, the closest in dollars on hand is high school teacher Frank Deserino, with $17,290. Most of that he donated to himself.

Three Denver “reform” candidates share more big donors

The top fundraiser for the recent three-week reporting cycle was Draper Carson, who is seeking to unseat incumbent Arturo Jimenez to represent District 5 northwest Denver on the board. Draper Carson raised $52,680, bringing her total to $177,440.

Details by candidate

Jimenez reported raising an additional $8,595 in the second reporting cycle, for a total of $68,073.

Emily Sirota, a candidate for the District 1 seat representing southeast Denver, raised the second-highest amount in the recent reporting period, with $29,331. That brings her total to $87,293.26.

Her opponent, Rowe, reported raising $20,525 for a cumulative total of $196,845.

Haynes, Draper Carson and Rowe, who have been endorsed by Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and other groups supportive of the reforms of Denver Schools Superintendent Tom Boasberg, share big donors.

In the first filing period, five men combined to give each candidate $82,000. Those contributors are Daniel Ritchie, CEO of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts; Henry Gordon, president of Strata Capital; Kent Thiry, CEO of DaVita Inc.; CU President Bruce Benson; and Scott Reiman of Hexagon Investments.

In the second reporting period, Richard Sapkin of Edgemark Development gave Draper Carson $10,000. He previously had given that amount to Haynes and to Rowe. So six donors have now combined to give each of the three candidates $92,000.

In addition, Michael Fries of Liberty Media gave $20,000 to Draper Carson during the second reporting cycle. He previously had given that amount to Rowe.

Teachers’ union still biggest contributor to two DPS candidates

Sirota and Jimenez share the endorsement of the Denver Classroom Teachers Association, and the union’s small donor committee is also their biggest donor.

  • Learn more about candidates for Denver, Douglas and Jefferson counties by clicking on the EdNews Election Center

Sirota received additional DCTA contributions of $14,000 in the second reporting period, bringing her DCTA total to $46,580 – or more than half of her total financial take. That doesn’t include the $24,860 in non-monetary contributions she’s received from the union, in members canvassing on her behalf.

Other contributors in the second reporting cycle included Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer, Sirota’s former boss, who donated $250 and headlined a fundraiser for her, and friends and family from outside the state such as Adam McKay, an actor and writer in LA, who’s given $6,000.

Jimenez, who previously received $24,000 from the DCTA and $6,000 from the statewide teachers union, the Colorado Education Association, reported no more financial contributions from teachers’ unions in the second reporting period.

He did list $7,400 in non-monetary contributions from the DCTA, in members canvassing for his re-election. That brings his total non-monetary contributions from the DCTA to $15,720.

Jimenez also has received $1,000 from the AFL-CIO and $250 from the Fraternal Order of Police, bringing his total monetary contributions from unions to $31,250. His biggest contributor in the second reporting cycle was Rob Alvarado, CEO of Palo Alto Inc., who gave $3,000.

DENVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS AT-LARGE RACE

Daniel

John Daniel

  • Daniel did not file a second campaign finance report so all numbers are for the first reporting period.
  • Total money raised: $244
  • Total spent: $237
  • Remaining balance: $7
  • Non-monetary contributions: 0
  • Largest donation to date: $244
  • Donors of note: Donor figures add up to more than $244; expenditures add up to $237, which Daniel lists as paying himself for advertising
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Deserino

Frank Deserino

  • Total money raised: $17,290 – $16,790 first filing period, $500 second filing period
  • Total spent: $17,793.43 – $13,057.14 first filing period, $4,736.29 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: (-$503.43)
  • Non-monetary contributions: 0
  • Largest donation to date: $15,500
  • Donors of note: Deserino donated $15,500 to his campaign; Denver school board member Jeannie Kaplan, $200; Retired CU professor William Juraschek, $200
  • Key expenditures: $3,545 to Robin Van Ausdall for consulting services
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Haynes

Allegra “Happy” Haynes

  • Total money raised: $230,037 – $213,789 first filing period, $16,248 second filing period
  • Total spent: $194,654.03 – $119,855.40 first filing period, $74,798.63 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $35,382.97
  • Non-monetary contributions: $36,326.38, including $31,191.04 Stand for Children in Denver, canvassing and staff support, and $4,062.60 Great Schools for Great Kids, staff support
  • Largest donation to date: $26,000
  • Donors of note: Dan Ritchie, CEO of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, $26,000; Henry Gordon, president of Strata Capital in Englewood, $25,000; Kent Thiry, CEO of DaVita Inc., $11,000; former Denver Public Schools Superintendent Evie Dennis, $150; former state Sen. Regis Groff, $100
  • Key expenditures: $50,500 to Terra Strategies of Des Moines for consulting services, $49,516.35 to Ridder/Braden Inc. for printed materials and design, $19,754.73 to C&D Printing for printing and postage
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Kilgore

Roger Kilgore

  • Total money raised: $9,841 – $8,464 first filing period, $1,377 second filing period
  • Total spent: $9,632.90 – $7,507.15 first filing period, $2,125.75 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $208.10
  • Non-monetary contributions: 0
  • Largest donation to date: $3,000
  • Donors of note: Kilgore donated $3,000 to his campaign; Realtor Candidate Political Action Committee, $300
  • Key expenditures: $2,727.66 to Campaign Products of the Rockies for advertising
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Shumway

Jacqui Shumway

  • Total money raised: $2,523.97 – $2,033.97 first filing period, $490 second filing period
  • Total spent: $1,852.47 – $1,852.47 first filing period, 0 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $671.50
  • Non-monetary contributions: $880, use of personal cell phone for campaign and website maintenance
  • Largest donation to date: $1,500
  • Donors of note: Shumway donated $1,500 to her campaign and transferred $493.97 from her 2009 school board campaign committee
  • Key expenditures: $1,631 for signage
  • Link to finance report

DENVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS – DISTRICT 1 SOUTHEAST DENVER

Ann
Rowe

Anne Rowe

  • Total money raised: $196,845 – $176,320 first filing period, $20,525 second filing period
  • Total spent: $149,108.04 – $100,607.65 first filing period, $48,500.39 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $47,736.96
  • Non-monetary contributions: $18,236.51, including $15,663.21 Stand for Children in Denver, canvassing and staff support, and $2,031.30 Great Schools for Great Kids, staff support
  • Largest donation to date: $26,000
  • Donors of note: Dan Ritchie, CEO of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, $26,000; Henry Gordon, president of Strata Capital in Englewood, $25,000; Kent Thiry, CEO of DaVita Inc., $25,000; Michael T. Fries, CEO of Liberty Media, $20,000; CU President Bruce Benson, founder of Benson Mineral Group, $10,000; former state lawmaker Pat Pascoe, $100; political consultant Eric Sondermann, $50
  • Key expenditures: $36,650 to Colorado Voter Contract for campaign field services, $12,338.16 to BC Printing for mailers and cards, $10,000 to Tyson Organization for phone calls
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Emily Sirota
Sirota

Emily Sirota

  • Total money raised: $87,293.26 – $57,962.26 first filing period, $29,331 second filing period
  • Total spent: $62,109.93 – $27,716.15 first filing period, $34,393.78 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $25,183.33
  • Non-monetary contributions: $25,162.64 – $11,676.48, including $11,200 to Denver Classroom Teachers Association for canvassing, first filing period; $13,846.16, including $13,660 to Denver Classroom Teachers Association for canvassing, second filing period
  • Largest donation to date: $46,580
  • Donors of note: Denver Classroom Teachers Association, small donor committee, $46,580 (doesn’t include non-monetary gifts); Adam McKay, actor/writer, Los Angeles, $6,000; Leo Hindery, managing partner of InterMedia, New York, $5,000; Denver school board member Jeannie Kaplan, $2,352; Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer, $250; State Sen. Morgan Carroll, $75
  • Key expenditures: $19,772.07 to Campaign Products of the Rockies for yard signs, printing, postage; $12,500 to Amanda Snipes, consulting services; $10,000 to Rocky Mountain Voter Outreach for canvassing
  • Link to finance report

DENVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS – DISTRICT 5 NORTHWEST DENVER

Draper Carson

Jennifer Draper Carson

  • Total money raised: $177,440 – $124,760 first filing period, $52,680 second filing period
  • Total spent: $152,347.67 – $103,712.14 first filing period, $48,635.53 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $25,092.33
  • Non-monetary contributions: $21,839.43, including $16,657.18 from Stand for Children in Denver, canvassing and staff support, and $4,062.60 from Great Schools for Great Kids, staff support
  • Largest donation to date: $26,000
  • Donors of note: Dan Ritchie, CEO of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, $26,000; Henry Gordon, president of Strata Capital in Englewood, $25,000; Michael Fries, Liberty Media in Englewood, $20,000; Kent Thiry, CEO of DaVita Inc., $11,000; Richard Sapkin, Edgemark Development, $10,000; Denver Scholarship Fund founding donor Timothy Marquez, Veneco, $2,000; Blueflower Fund, small donor committee supporting female Democratic candidates, $250
  • Key expenditures: $50,237.50 to Terra Strategies of Des Moines for consulting services, $18,716.36 to Ridder/Braden for consulting and mail services
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Jimenez

Arturo Jimenez

  • Total money raised: $68,073 – $59,478 first filing period, $8,595 second filing period
  • Total spent: $57,614.16 – $40,210.45 first filing period, $17,403.71 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $13,398.07 (includes $2,939.23 from prior school board campaign fund)
  • Non-monetary contributions: $16,232.90, including $15,720 from Denver Classroom Teachers Association, canvassing
  • Largest donation to date: $24,000
  • Donors of note: Denver Classroom Teachers Association, small donor committee, $24,000 (does not include non-monetary donations); Colorado Education Association, small donor committee, $6,000; Rob Alvarado, CEO of Palo Alto Inc., $3,000; AFL-CIO, small donor committee, $1,000; Denver school board member Jeannie Kaplan, $1,440.94; Colorado Fraternal Order of Police, small donor committee, $250
  • Key expenditures: $28,642.18 to C&D Printing for campaign materials, $12,166.66 to Dave Sabados for campaign management
  • Link to finance report

DOUGLAS COUNTY – DISTRICT A

Meek

Susan Meek

  • Total money raised: $3,732.96 – $3,062.97 first filing period, $669.99 second filing period
  • Total spent: $2,679.63 – $402.78 first filing period, $2,276.85 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $1,053.33
  • Non-monetary contributions: 0
  • Largest donation to date: $1,000
  • Donors of note: Jim Christensen, former Douglas County schools superintendent, $1,000
  • Key expenditures: $1,073.92 for campaign postcards
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Reilly

Kevin Reilly

  • Total money raised: $2,823.46 – $2,725.68 first filing period, $97.78 second filing period
  • Total spent: $1,300.92 – $1,276.39 first filing period, $24.53 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $1,522.54
  • Non-monetary contributions: $63.85, campaign kickoff party
  • Largest donation to date: $350
  • Donors of note: Sarah Mann, chair of the Douglas County Democratic Party, $350; Reilly loaned himself $858.19
  • Key expenditures: $507.43 for business cards and brochures
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Richardson

Craig Richardson

  • Total money raised: $20,900 – $20,700 first filing period, $200 second filing period
  • Total spent: $16,936.36 – $1,725.75 first filing period, $15,210.61 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $3,963.64
  • Non-monetary contributions: $1,045.79, including $1,016.24 from Douglas County Republican Central Committee for mailer
  • Largest donation to date: Two donations of $10,000 each
  • Donors of note: Ed McVaney, founder and former CEO of J.D. Edwards software corp., $10,000; Ralph Nagel, president of Top Rock investments, $10,000; Richardson donated his campaign $500; Marge Knutson, retired, Franktown, $100
  • Key expenditures: $15,080.41 to Wiz Bang Solutions for mailers
  • Link to finance report

DOUGLAS COUNTY – DISTRICT C

Frances

Gail Frances

  • Total money raised: $3,739.34 – $2974.34 first filing period, $765 second filing period
  • Total spent: $2,607.65 – $1,425.32 first filing period, $1,182.33 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $1,131.69
  • Non-monetary contributions: $123.84, including $63.85, campaign kickoff party
  • Largest donation to date: Two donors gave $250
  • Donors of note: Daniel Galloway, attorney in Lone Tree, $250; Sarah Mann, chair of the Douglas County Democratic Party, $250; Frances has loaned her campaign $556.80
  • Key expenditures: $423 for yard signs
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Larsen

Kevin Larsen

  • Total money raised: $20,820.23 – $20,105 first filing period, $715.23 second filing period
  • Total spent: $16,993.76 – $1,796.90 first filing period, $15,196.86 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $3,826.47
  • Non-monetary contributions:$1,045.79, including $1,016.24 from Douglas County Republican Central Committee for mailer
  • Largest donation to date: Two donations of $10,000 each
  • Donors of note: Ed McVaney, founder and former CEO of J.D. Edwards software corp., $10,000; Ralph Nagel, president of Top Rock investments, $10,000; current Douglas County School Board President John Carson, $100; Gerald Stueven, Platte River Academy principal, $100
  • Key expenditures: $15,080.41 to Wiz Bang Solutions for mailers
  • Link to finance report

DOUGLAS COUNTY – DISTRICT F

McMahon

Susan McMahon

  • Total money raised: $11,029.30 – $8,444 first filing period, $2,585.30 second filing period
  • Total spent: $8,670.88 – $7,957.78 first filing period, $713.10 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $2,358.42
  • Non-monetary contributions: $6,530.36, including $3,125 each from John and Ronda Funchess for video
  • Largest donation to date: $1,000
  • Donors of note: Deborah Hill of Castle Rock, not currently employed, $1,000; Jerri Hill, attorney, Parker, $435; Sarah Mann, chair of the Douglas County Democratic Party, $275; Blueflower Fund, small donor committee supporting female Democratic candidates, $200; State Sen. Evie Hudak, $25
  • Key expenditures: $4,991.13 to C&D Printing for mailers
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Williams

Justin Williams

  • Total money raised: $21,785 – $20,820 first filing period, $965 second filing period
  • Total spent: $17,208.49 – $2,535.63 first filing period, $14,672.86 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $4,576.51
  • Non-monetary contributions: $1,245.79, including $1,016.24 from Douglas County Republican Central Committee for mailer
  • Largest donation to date: Two donations of $10,000 each
  • Donors of note: Ed McVaney, founder and former CEO of J.D. Edwards software corp., $10,000; Ralph Nagel, president of Top Rock investments, $10,000; current Douglas County School Board President John Carson, $100
  • Key expenditures: $15,080.41 to Wiz Bang Solutions for mailers
  • Link to finance report

JEFFERSON COUNTY – DISTRICT 3

Branaugh

Preston Branaugh

  • Total money raised: $8,855 – $7,795 first filing period, $1,060 second filing period
  • Total spent: $1,132.10 – $308.15 first filing period, $823.95 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $7,722.90
  • Non-monetary contributions: 0
  • Largest donation to date: Two donors gave $1,000 each
  • Donors of note: John Coors of Evergreen, CEO of CoorsTek and part of the Coors brewery family, $1,000; Andy Hoover of Littleton, retired, $1,000; Ron Ellis, Englewood, $300; Mountain Republican Women, $250; U.S. Congressman Mike Coffman, $100; Colorado State Board of Education member Debora Scheffel, $50
  • Key expenditures: $570 to Tactical Data Solutions for fundraising expenses
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Fellman

Jill Fellman

  • Total money raised: $43,581 – $31,096 first filing period, $12,485 second filing period
  • Total spent: $40,343.66 – $11,632.73 first filing period, $28,710.93 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $3,237.34
  • Non-monetary contributions: $55.97, most in the form of pencils
  • Largest donation to date: Three donors gave $1,000 each
  • Donors of note: Jonathan Abramson, attorney, $1,000; Kelly Johnson of Golden, no occupation, $1,000; John Sands, attorney, $1000; Realtor Candidate political action committee, $500; U.S. Congressman Ed Perlmutter, $250; Jane Goff, former Jeffco board member and current State Board of Education member, $200; Hereford Percy, former Jeffco board member and current chair of the Colorado Commission on Higher Education, $200; Jefferson County Democratic Party, $50
  • Key expenditures: $19,723.64 to C&D Printing for postage
  • Link to finance report

JEFFERSON COUNTY – DISTRICT 4

Dahlkemper

Lesley Dahlkemper

  • Total money raised: $54,592 – $42,422 first filing period, $12,170 second filing period
  • Total spent: $33,673.40 – $19,788.43 first filing period, $13,884.97 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $20,918.60
  • Non-monetary contributions: 0
  • Largest donation to date: $2,500
  • Donors of note: Greg Stevinson, Denver West Properties, $2,500; John Sands, attorney, $2,450; Robert Benson, AMBP, $2,000; Blueflower Fund, a small donor committee supporting female Democratic candidates, $350; U.S. Congressman Jared Polis, $250; U.S. Sen. Mark Udall, $200
  • Key expenditures: $13,433.34 to Colorado Data Mail for fliers, postcards and thank you cards
  • Link to finance report

Candidates listed in alphabetical order

Powers

Jim Powers

  • Total money raised: $8,595 – $8,370 first filing period, $225 second filing period
  • Total spent: $1,619.76 – $795.81 first filing period, $823.95 second filing period
  • Remaining balance: $6,975.24
  • Non-monetary contributions: 0
  • Largest donation to date: $1,000
  • Donors of note: Andy Hoover of Littleton, retired, $1,000; Mountain Republican Women, $250; Tim Cuthriell, retired, Morrison, $200
  • Key expenditures: $570 to Tactical Data Solutions for fundraising expenses
  • Link to finance report

What's Your Education Story?

As the 2018 school year begins, join us for storytelling from Indianapolis educators

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy/Chalkbeat
Sarah TeKolste, right, and Lori Jenkins at a Teacher Story Slam, in April.

In partnership with Teachers Lounge Indy, Chalkbeat is hosting another teacher story slam this fall featuring educators from across the city.

Over the past couple of years, Chalkbeat has brought readers personal stories from teachers and students through the events. Some of our favorites touched on how a teacher won the trust of her most skeptical student, why another teacher decided to come out to his students, and one educator’s call to ramp up the number of students pursuing a college education.

The event, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, is free and open to the public — please RSVP here.

Event details:

5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018
Tube Factory artspace
1125 Cruft St., Indianapolis, IN 46203
Get tickets here and find more on Facebook

More in What's Your Education Story?

School safety

Hiring more security officers in Memphis after school shootings could have unintended consequences

PHOTO: Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Tennessee’s largest district, Shelby County Schools, is slated to add more school resource officers under the proposed budget for next school year.

Superintendent Dorsey Hopson earmarked $2 million to hire 30 school resource officers in addition to the 98 already in some of its 150-plus schools. The school board is scheduled to vote on the budget Tuesday.

But an increase in law enforcement officers could have unintended consequences.

A new state law that bans local governments from refusing to cooperate with federal immigration officials could put school resource officers in an awkward position.

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen recently reminded school personnel they are not obligated to release student information regarding immigration status. School resource officers employed by police or sheriff’s departments, however, do not answer to school districts. Shelby County Schools is still reviewing the law, but school board members have previously gone on the record emphasizing their commitment to protecting undocumented students.

“Right now we are just trying to get a better understanding of the law and the impact that it may have,” said Natalia Powers, a district spokeswoman.

Also, incidents of excessive force and racial bias toward black students have cropped up in recent years. Two white Memphis officers were fired in 2013 after hitting a black student and wrestling her to the ground because she was “yelling and cussing” on school grounds. And mothers of four elementary school students recently filed a lawsuit against a Murfreesboro officer who arrested them at school in 2016 for failing to break up a fight that occurred off-campus.

Just how common those incidents are in Memphis is unclear. In response to Chalkbeat’s query for the number and type of complaints in the last two school years, Shelby County Schools said it “does not have any documents responsive to this request.”

Currently, 38 school resource officers are sheriff’s deputies, and the rest are security officers hired by Shelby County Schools. The officers respond and work to prevent criminal activity in all high schools and middle schools, Hopson said. The 30 additional officers would augment staffing at some schools and for the first time, branch out to some elementary schools. Hopson said those decisions will be based on crime rates in surrounding neighborhoods and school incidents.

Hopson’s initial recommendation for more school resource officers was in response to the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that killed 17 people and sparked a wave of student activism on school safety, including in Memphis.

Gov. Bill Haslam’s recent $30 million budget boost would allow school districts across Tennessee to hire more law enforcement officers or improve building security. Measures to arm some teachers with guns or outlaw certain types of guns have fallen flat.


For more on the role and history of school resource officers in Tennessee, read our five things to know.


Sheriff’s deputies and district security officers meet weekly, said Capt. Dallas Lavergne of the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office. When the Memphis Police Department pulled their officers out of school buildings following the merger of city and county school systems, the county Sheriff’s Office replaced them with deputies.

All deputy recruits go through school resource officer training, and those who are assigned to schools get additional annual training. In a 2013 review of police academies across the nation, Tennessee was cited as the only state that had specific training for officers deployed to schools.