The College Board, the company that administers the Advanced Placement history course that has recently become the center of a firestorm in Jefferson County, threw its support on Friday afternoon behind the hundreds of Jeffco high school students who walked out of class this week to protest a proposed curriculum review committee.

“These students recognize that the social order can – and sometimes must – be disrupted in the pursuit of liberty and justice,” the organization said in a statement. “Civil disorder and social strife are at the patriotic heart of American history – from the Boston Tea Party to the American Revolution to the Civil Rights Movement. And these events and ideas are essential within the study of a college-level, AP U.S. History course.”

The proposed committee, first proposed by Jeffco board member Julie Williams last week, would review courses offered in the district — beginning with the AP U.S. history class — to make sure that materials do not “encourage or condone civil disorder, social strife or disregard of the law,” and that curriculum “present positive aspects of the United States and its heritage.” Since then, hundreds of students in the suburban Denver district have protested, arguing that such criteria for board oversight of coursework would effectively white-wash history and censor their instructors.

In its statement, the College Board warned of additional possible consequences if Jeffco’s board proceeds with its review committee: if the board moves to alter the coursework in any way, the district could risk losing the AP designation — a common marker for colleges to understand that students have taken higher-level coursework — for the class.

In interviews, Jeffco board president Ken Witt has said that he believes the board’s job is to monitor curriculum and would be willing to eliminate the disputed course if the board found it to be inappropriate for the district.

The College Board’s complete statement is below:

A Statement on Censorship of AP® U.S. History

26 September 2014

The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program® supports the actions taken by students in Jefferson County, Colorado to protest a school board member’s request to censor aspects of the AP U.S. History course. The board member claims that some historical content in the course “encouraged or condoned civil disorder, social strife, or disregard for the law.”

These students recognize that the social order can – and sometimes must – be disrupted in the pursuit of liberty and justice. Civil disorder and social strife are at the patriotic heart of American history – from the Boston Tea Party to the American Revolution to the Civil Rights Movement. And these events and ideas are essential within the study of a college-level, AP U.S. History course.

The College Board will always listen to principled concerns based on evidence – and in fact has announced a public-review process for the AP U.S. History course framework. But in light of current events, an important policy reminder is in order:

College faculty and AP teachers collaborate to develop, deliver, and evaluate AP courses and exams. Their partnership ensures that these courses align with the content and rigor of college-level learning, while still providing teachers with the flexibility to examine topics of local interest in greater depth.

To offer a course labeled “AP” or “Advanced Placement,” a school must agree to meet the expectations set for such courses by the more than 3,300 colleges and universities across the globe that use AP Exam scores for credit, placement, or consideration in the admission process.

As vital context for the courageous voices of the students in Colorado, the AP community, our member institutions and the American people can rest assured: If a school or district censors essential concepts from an Advanced Placement course, that course can no longer bear the “AP” designation.