Smart choices

Liking school is good for teens’ sexual health, report finds

PHOTO: Stephanie Snyder

Students who like school and care about graduating make better choices about sex, according to a new report from the advocacy group Colorado Youth Matter.

The report, released last week, revealed that students with positive attitudes about school have intercourse with fewer partners and use birth control more often.

Lisa Olcese, executive director of Colorado Youth Matter, said it was the report’s most compelling finding and a call to action for educators.

It speaks “to the importance of engaging the whole student,” she said. “Connectedness at school is a protective factor, so how does each school community think about that?”

The report, which comes on the heels of a New York Times story highlighting Colorado’s surprising success in reducing teen pregnancy, fleshes out state trends in teen sexual activity and pregnancy rates.

Among the report’s other findings:

  • Teens who have teachers, relatives or other adults with whom they feel comfortable discussing sensitive issues are more likely to delay sexual intercourse, have fewer sexual partners and use condoms.
  • Latina teens have the highest birth rate among racial and ethnic groups in Colorado, but have also experienced the greatest decline—71 percent—since 2000.
  • A decade ago, Denver and Adams County were among the 10 Colorado counties with the highest teen birth rates. Both have now dropped out of the top 10—closely tracking statewide reductions that observers credit to an initiative to provide long-acting contraceptives to teens and poor women.
  • The counties with the highest teen birth rates are now all rural, though all have much lower rates than the top 10 counties a decade ago.
  • Colorado’s rate of HIV infection among teens increased from 2013 to 2014—most significantly in Denver—but it’s still below national levels.
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth are at much higher risk of being bullied or sexually assaulted at school.

The “State of Adolescent Health in Colorado” report is available for $8 from Colorado Youth Matter.

Enrichment gap

Here’s which Denver students lose out on summer enrichment

PHOTO: Hero Images | Getty Images

Denver’s black students, followed by Hispanic students have the lowest access to summer camps and classes while students with the best access are more likely to be white and higher-income, and have college-educated parents, according to a study released this fall.

Conducted by researchers from the University of Washington, the study builds on research that finds children in more affluent families are more likely to enjoy summer enrichment activities, such as visits to museums, historical sites, concerts or plays. Some scholars call it the “shadow education system.”

Two staff members from the Seattle-based Center on Reinventing Publication, a partner in the analysis, wrote in a blog post that there’s been much attention to achievement gaps and gaps in access to high-quality schools, but little talk of enrichment gaps.

“This research is the first step that cities can take to better understand the enrichment gaps that exist between student groups,” they wrote. “The next step is finding solutions to help fill the gaps.”

The study used data from a searchable online database of summer programs that expanded to Colorado from St. Louis with help from ReSchool Colorado, originally a project of the Donnell Kay Foundation and now a stand-alone nonprofit organization. The study is a working paper and has not been peer-reviewed. 

A look at the study’s color-coded maps shows a red streak of neighborhoods across central and northwest Denver with high access to summer programming. Blue low-access neighborhoods are clumped in northeast Denver and southwest Denver. Among them are the heavily Hispanic neighborhoods of Mar Lee, Ruby Hill and Westwood, near the city’s border with Jefferson County. At the other end of the city, Montbello and Gateway-Green Valley Ranch — and more affluent, mostly-white Stapleton — are among neighborhoods designated as having low access to summer programs and large child populations.

In addition to differences based on race and income, the researchers found that low access areas of Denver had more English language learners and that residents were less likely than in high-access neighborhoods to have been born in the U.S.

While the study found that summer programs, especially sports programs, are not evenly distributed around Denver, it revealed that parks and libraries are. The researchers recommended that policy-makers use those public spaces to more evenly distribute summer programs. It also suggested that until community leaders create those additional programs in low-access neighborhoods, families be given bus passes or ride-service vouchers to help them travel to programs outside their neighborhoods.

Clarification: This story has been updated to reflect that ReSchool Colorado did not create the searchable online database of summer programs, but helped bring it to Colorado.

#WontBeErased

Denver school board pledges to make sure LGBTQ students are ‘seen, accepted, and celebrated’

PHOTO: Andy Cross/The Denver Post
Ellie Ozbayrak, 4, sports rainbow wings at the annual PrideFest celebration at Civic Center Park June 18, 2016.

In response to reports that the Trump administration may seek to narrowly define gender as a condition determined by genitalia at birth, the Denver school board Thursday unanimously adopted a resolution in support of transgender students and staff members.

“The board, with its community members and partners, find this federal action to be cruel and harmful to our students and employees,” the resolution said. Denver Public Schools “will not allow our students, staff, and families to feel that they are being erased.”

The Trump administration has not yet made a final decision. But the threat of reversing actions taken under the Obama administration to recognize transgender Americans has prompted protests across the country, including a recent walkout at Denver’s North High School.

Several Denver students thanked the school board Thursday for the resolution, which says the board “wholeheartedly embraces DPS’s LGBTQ+ students, employees, and community members for the diversity they bring to our schools and workplaces, and strives to ensure that they are seen, accepted, and celebrated for who they truly are.”

“It is amazing to hear each and every single one of your ‘ayes,’” said a student named Skyler.

The resolution lists several ways the district supports transgender students and staff, including not requiring them “to undertake any expensive formal legal process to change their names in DPS student or personnel records” and honoring their pronoun preferences.

Read the entire resolution below.