More than 100 top-ranked New York City schools could be exempt from a prescriptive teacher evaluation system approved by state lawmakers earlier this week, according to the official charged with finalizing the new system.

The schools, which include both elite screened schools and popular zoned schools, are on a statewide list that Board of Regents Chancellor Merryl Tisch told Chalkbeat may make them be eligible for a waiver because of their students’ high performance. Of 354 schools that earned the distinction last August, 103 are in New York City.

Tisch cautioned that she is still not sure how much flexibility she has under the new law, which charges the state education department and Board of Regents with filling in the details of a new plan. But if schools are allowed to develop alternative evaluation systems, it would mark a significant shift in the way teacher evaluations work citywide.

“Where this goes and how this goes I don’t know,” Tisch said, “but I just thought it should be part of the conversation.”

Tisch has already proposed exempting some high-performing districts, as reported by Capital New YorkOn Thursday, Tisch said she believes the same principles apply to individual schools.

For the last two years, city schools have used the same basic framework for evaluations, with state test scores and teacher observations each counting for a portion of a teacher’s final rating, which ranges from ineffective to highly effective. There has been some variation, though most teachers have been rated effective or better, with some schools opting to use additional city-created assessments, for example, while others tried different rubrics or peer evaluations through an experimental program.

The schools that could be exempt from the new system, according to Tisch, are the state’s “reward schools,” a designation created in 2012 when state officials sought and received a waiver of their own from some requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind law. Eight of the 103 city schools on the list that also receive federal Title I funding for having a large share of needy students became eligible for separate grants to share ideas and work with low-performing schools. Applications for those grants were due earlier this week, according to the state education department’s web site.

Several of the city’s other reward schools have strict screening policies, or are housed in zones that pull from affluent neighborhoods. As a result, they admit and serve some of the city’s top-performing students.

They include elite specialized high schools like Stuyvesant High School and Brooklyn Technical High School; citywide gifted and talented programs, like the Anderson School and the Talented and Gifted School for Young Scholars; and hugely popular zoned elementary schools like Brooklyn’s P.S. 321.

There are also many schools serving higher-need populations. More than half of the students in 25 of the elementary and middle schools, for instance, qualified for free lunch last year, according to city data. At P.S 42, in Chinatown and P.S. 172 in Sunset Park, for instance, nearly 90 percent of students receive free lunch and about 30 percent of students speak a language other than English at home.

To earn the distinction, schools had to rank in the top 20 percent of schools on state test scores for two straight years, or in the top 10 percent on student growth on the tests in 2012-13; all student subgroups had to make academic progress; and there couldn’t be “unacceptably large” achievement gaps between a school’s low-income students and their peers.

Tisch did not elaborate on exactly what those schools might do instead of implementing the state’s evaluation system. But the idea of allowing schools within a district to use different systems is certain to raise questions, and Tisch’s proposal to allow district exemptions had already sparked sharp criticism from the state teachers union.

“Now the chancellor seems to be floating a ‘yacht’ evaluation plan for some communities and non-stop testing pressure for the rest,” New York State United Teachers President Karen Magee said in a statement.

Here are New York City’s Reward Schools for the 2014-12 school year:

PS 42 BENJAMIN ALTMAN

PS 172 BEACON SCHOOL OF EXCELLENCE

PS 161 ARTHUR ASHE SCHOOL

PS 36 UNIONPORT

MOTT HALL SCHOOL

THE BRIGHTER CHOICE COMMUNITY SCHOOL

PS 176 OVINGTON MAGNET SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE, DESIGN

PS 120

PS 112 LEFFERTS PARK

PS 130 HERNANDO DE SOTO

PS 24 ANDREW JACKSON

PS 304 EARLY CHILDHOOD SCHOOL

PS 255 BARBARA REING SCHOOL

IS 227 LOUIS ARMSTRONG

IS 392

PS 235 LENOX SCHOOL

PS 124 YUNG WING

MEDGAR EVERS COLLEGE PREP SCHOOL

PS 184 SHUANG WEN

QUEENS GATEWAY TO HEALTH SCIENCE SECONDARY SCHOOL

PS/IS 113 ANTHONY J PRANZO

PS 133

PS 31 SAMUEL F DUPONT

IS 187 THE CHRISTA MCAULIFFE SCHOOL

PS 32 STATE STREET

PS 18 WINCHESTER

SCHOLARS’ ACADEMY

PS 162 JOHN GOLDEN

PS 173 FRESH MEADOW

IRWIN ALTMAN MIDDLE SCHOOL 172

PS 31 BAYSIDE

TAG YOUNG SCHOLARS

PS 191 MAYFLOWER

PS 26 RUFUS KING

PS 115 GLEN OAKS

QUEENS COLLEGE SCHOOL-MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY

PS 213 THE CARL ULLMAN SCHOOL

PS 11 PURVIS J BEHAN

PS 205 ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL

PS 46 ALLEY POND

PS 47 CHRIS GALAS

PS 159

PS 35 THE CLOVE VALLEY SCHOOL

PS 11 WILLIAM T HARRIS

NYC LAB MIDDLE SCHOOL FOR COLLABORATIVE STUDIES

MS 260 CLINTON SCHOOL WRITERS & ARTISTS

PS/IS 266

MARK TWAIN IS 239-GIFTED & TALENTED

PS 50 FRANK HANKINSON

PS 78

PS 41 CROCHERON

PS 53 BAY TERRACE

PS 1 TOTTENVILLE

PS 203 OAKLAND GARDENS

JHS 67 LOUIS PASTEUR

PS 186 CASTLEWOOD

PS 94 DAVID D PORTER

PS 195 MANHATTAN BEACH

PS 221 THE NORTH HILLS SCHOOL

MATH & SCIENCE EXPLORATORY SCHOOL

PS 144 COL JEROMUS REMSEN

NEW EXPLORATIONS SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & MATH

PS 212 MIDTOWN WEST

PS 196 GRAND CENTRAL PARKWAY

PS 188 KINGSBURY

MS 255 SALK SCHOOL OF SCIENCE

PS 5 HUGUENOT

PS 58 THE CARROLL

EAST SIDE MIDDLE SCHOOL

PS 158 BAYARD TAYLOR

PS 59 BEEKMAN HILL INTERNATIONAL

PS 40 AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS

PS 98 THE DOUGLASTON SCHOOL

PS 290 MANHATTAN NEW SCHOOL

PS 321 WILLIAM PENN

PS 199 JESSIE ISADOR STRAUS

SPECIAL MUSIC SCHOOL

PS 87 WILLIAM SHERMAN

THE ANDERSON SCHOOL

PS 6 LILLIE D BLAKE

PS 234 INDEPENDENCE SCHOOL

PS 77 LOWER LAB SCHOOL

PS 89

PS 183 ROBERT L STEVENSON

NYC LAB HS-COLLABORATIVE STUDIES

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT HIGH SCHOOL

MILLENNIUM HIGH SCHOOL

BARUCH COLLEGE CAMPUS HIGH SCHOOL

STUYVESANT HIGH SCHOOL

HS-DUAL LANGUAGE & ASIAN STUDIES

FIORELLO H LAGUARDIA HIGH SCHOOL

HS MATH SCIENCE & ENGINEERING AT CCNY

BRONX CENTER FOR SCIENCE & MATH

BRONX HIGH SCHOOL OF SCIENCE

HS AMERICAN STUDIES AT LEHMAN COLLEGE

BROOKLYN TECH HIGH SCHOOL

BEDFORD ACADEMY HIGH SCHOOL

LEON M GOLDSTEIN HIGH SCHOOL

TOWNSEND HARRIS HIGH SCHOOL

JAMAICA GATEWAY TO THE SCIENCES

QUEENS HIGH SCHOOL AT YORK COLLEGE

STATEN ISLAND TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL