Raise the age

Educators and students help lead the charge in New York’s ‘Raise the Age’ criminal justice campaign

Assistant Principal Benjamin Geballe (left) poses outside the New York Senate chamber with students Dash Avincula (center left), Alex Bristol (center right) and Kayla Mowatt (right).

Before Kayla Mowatt headed up to Albany to join advocates in a rally to “Raise the Age” at which young people are tried as adults in New York, she did some research.

The eighth-grader at Lower Manhattan Community Middle School talked to her dad, a state corrections officer, about why a teen might be charged as an adult when it comes to serious crimes. Then Mowatt scoured the internet and learned that young men of color were disproportionately represented in the criminal justice system.

“Because I’m African American, and my brothers are African American, I felt really strongly about this,” she said. “I wouldn’t want my brothers to have a mistake put on their records.”

At the invitation of her principal, Mowatt, the school’s student council president, joined advocates from across the state this week to lobby for changes in how New York treats minors in the justice system. She and other students met with Senate staffers to share their thoughts.

“Kids learn the most by doing,” said Benjamin Geballe, assistant principal at the school. He took Mowatt and two other students to the state capitol so they could witness “democracy in action,” Geballe said.

“I realized when I was listening to these kids talk up there, they were pulling together so many different skills and pieces of knowledge that they’ve learned in middle school,” he added.

In meetings with Senate staffers, one student talked about how the adolescent brain forms well into adulthood — a lesson he remembered from seventh-grade science. Another drew on class discussions about race to talk about inequities in the justice system, Geballe said.

New York is one of only two states that prosecutes all 16- and 17-year olds as adults in the criminal justice system, according to Raise the Age, a coalition of dozens of community organizations. Almost 28,000 adolescents in New York are arrested each year. A majority of those arrests — 72 percent — are for misdemeanor crimes, according to the campaign.

New York’s harsh approach is troubling to many educators, said Jonathan Spear, an education consultant and supporter of the Raise the Age campaign.

“They just have a more true and general understanding of what a 16- and 17-year-old is,” said Spear, who co-founded ARC Impact, a company that works with schools and districts on how to better use their time and resources. “I hope, too, that educators have more experience seeing kids turn their lives around from bad to good.”

Teens, faith leaders and educators will make their case at an event Monday with Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Central Synagogue, working in collaboration with Congregation Beth Elohim, is hosting the meeting from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Midtown.

Future of Schools

School shooting reported at Noblesville West Middle School

One adult and one teen were injured in a shooting at Noblesville West Middle School Friday morning, according to the Indiana State Police and the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office. The suspect is in custody.

The adult victim was taken to Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis, and the teen victim was taken to Riley Children’s Hospital in Indianapolis. Their families have been notified. No information is available on their status.

The police do not believe there are any additional suspects.

Students are being moved to Noblesville High School.

A Chalkbeat reporter is on the scene.

Noblesville West Middle School enrolls about 1,300 students in Hamilton County, a suburban community just north of Indianapolis. The district has just over 10,500.

This story will be updated.

temporary reprieve

Parents score a temporary victory in slowing the closure of a small Brooklyn elementary school

PHOTO: Alex Zimmerman
Protesters gathered at the education department's headquarters to protest a recent set of closure plans.

A judge blocked the closure of a small Brooklyn elementary school Thursday — at least for now.

Three families from P.S. 25/the Eubie Blake School filed a lawsuit in March backed by the public interest group Advocates for Justice, arguing the city’s decision to close the school was illegal because the local elected parent council was not consulted.

Brooklyn Supreme Court judge Katherine Levine did not make a final ruling Thursday about whether the closure plan violated the law. But she issued a temporary order to keep the school open while the case moves forward.

It was not immediately clear when the case will be resolved or even if the school will remain open next year. “We are reviewing the stay and will determine an appropriate course of action once the judge makes a final decision on the case,” education department spokeswoman Toya Holness wrote in a statement.

The education department said the school has hemorrhaged students in recent years and is simply too small to be viable: P.S. 25 currently enrolls just 94 students in grades K-5.

“Because of extremely low enrollment, the school lacks the necessary resources to meet the needs of students,” Holness wrote. The city’s Panel for Educational Policy, a citywide oversight board that must sign off on all school closures, voted in February to close the school.

But the school’s supporters point out that despite low test scores in the past, P.S. 25 now ranks among the city’s top elementary schools, meaning that its closure would force students into lower-performing schools elsewhere.

“Why close a school that’s doing so well?” said Leonie Haimson, the executive director of Class Size Matters and one of the lawsuit’s supporters. “It doesn’t make sense to me.”

The lawsuit hinges on a state law that gives local education councils the authority to approve any changes to school zones. Since P.S. 25 is the only zoned elementary school for a swath of Bedford-Stuyvesant, the department’s plans would leave some families with no zoned elementary school dedicated to educating them, forcing students to attend other district schools or enter the admissions lottery for charter schools.

That amounts to “effectively attempting to change zoning lines” and “unlawfully usurping” the local education council’s authority to determine those zones, according to the lawsuit.

But even if the education department loses the lawsuit, the school’s fate would still be uncertain. The closure plan would theoretically be subject to a vote from the local education council, whose president supports shuttering the school.

Still, Haimson hopes the lawsuit ultimately persuades the education department to back away from closing the school in the long run.

“My goal would be to get the chancellor to change his mind,” Haimson said. “I don’t think the future is preordained.”