food and finance high school

coming to a boil

the end

New York

For some teachers, job hunt calculus includes possible buyout

Inside a Columbia University building, hundreds of teachers rubbed shoulders while chatting up recruiters from 80 schools. A late-summer city teacher recruitment fair bustled with newly-trained Teaching Fellows and experienced teachers still looking for jobs yesterday. But no one was lined up to talk to leaders from Food and Finance High School shortly after 4 p.m. The school has top marks from the Department of Education and a graduation rate that far exceeds the city average. But the fair was less than fruitful, recruiters said, because they only have one position available: a social studies job that is subject to city hiring restrictions. "All of these young candidates are coming in bright eyed, and yet there's a freeze on history," said Joseph Clausi, the high school's recruiter and an assistant principal. "They come here with these great resumes, and we can't even talk to them." His was among close to 80 schools attending the fair. Others, like Pelham Academy of Academics and Community Engagement, a Bronx middle school the Bronx Theater High School, and representatives from the New Visions Network of schools had lines snaking around the rows of booths set up in an auditorium at Columbia University.  The city has been slowly lifting its three-year-old hiring restrictions, which have limited the numbers of new teachers who can compete for jobs with teachers currently in the city's system. But there is still a hiring freeze on some teaching areas and subjects, such as high school social studies and regular elementary school positions. The event was open only to city teachers hunting for new positions, as well as Teaching Fellows, Teach for America recruits, and teachers from outside the school system who had registered with the Department of Education. City officials told principals not to advertise the time or location, which were once posted on the internet but later removed.