Francis Lewis High School

New York

More Equal than Others

Overcrowding comes to city schools for various reasons. In my school, our reputation makes kids want to come, we have magnet programs like JROTC that attract kids from near and far, and there's never been a cap on enrollment. Neighborhood schools like PS 123 don't get the opportunity to grow and expand because other schools are simply placed into whatever vacant spaces they may have. In fact, as Juan Gonzalez reported, space they'd actually been using was commandeered by a charter school chain. It now appears Eva Moskowitz's Harlem Success Academy will be taking that space permanently. PS 123 has gone from an F-rated school to a B-rated school, and you'd think that would merit some encouragement from the Department of Education. You'd be mistaken. Rather than expand upon the progress they've made, the building that houses PS 123 has become a civics lesson for all who teach and study there—a newly designed two-tier education system. 55 years ago, Brown v. Board of Education stated, “separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." At PS 123, separate educational facilities can be found within the same school building. In fact, some families have one kid in 123, and another in HSA. But it's pretty clear to all that the schools are different. For one thing, all HSA classrooms are painted and renovated before kids even attend. A few weeks ago, protesters questioned why the whole school couldn't be painted, rather than just the HSA section. You have to wonder why an administration that prides itself on placing “children first” would allow so many children to be second priority.