getting to know you

getting to know you

getting to know you

getting to know you

New York

Back to class: New chancellor takes a tour of five city schools

Today marks Cathie Black's first official day as chancellor of the city's public schools and she's following in former Chancellor Joel Klein's footsteps by taking a five-borough tour. We'll be following her throughout the day as she makes her way from Brooklyn to Staten Island and back to Tweed. Stephan Zuvich, a student at the Richard Hungerford School gives Black a tour. 3:00: And that's all folks... We'll post video once Maura returns from Staten Island. 2:40: Black's visit to the Hungerford School may seem like a deviation from the rest of the day, but it is, yet again, another high performing school. Hungerford is the only special education school in all of New York State to be recognized as a national blue ribbon school. In the sensory motor center, aka game room, Black and the remaining reporters watch one student play on a pinball machine while another plays Wii sports and a third shoots a basketball. "I'm so excited," Hecht says. "The questions that she [Black] was asking were so poignant and so on the mark for the students that we're serving. I'd love to see the D75 schools become more integrated, so its not like D75, it's part of the whole system." 2:15: The press van has landed at Richard H. Hungerford School, a District 75 school with about 350 students in Staten Island. D75 schools like this one serve students with severe disabilities. Black is led around the school by Stephan Zuvich, a 21-year-old student at the school. She goes into a classroom where half a dozen students, all in wheelchairs, are getting physical therapy, and she walks around introducing herself to each student. Maura reports that the PT class has Christmas music playing quietly in the background, and the ceiling is draped in white and colored lights, hanging mobiles, and planets. Principal Mary McInerney tells the group that the room is set up this way to stimulate the students. D75 Superintendent Gary Hecht tells Black that she's the first chancellor to visit one of his schools on the annual (or this year: biannual) five-borough schools tour. McIerney says that when chancellors have come in the past, it's always been at the end, not the beginning, of their tenures. Black says that DOE officials picked this school because she told them she wanted to see all the different kinds of schools. Black visits a second class where students are communicating through a machine called an ACD (augmented communication device). One student asks her if she was nervous on her first day of work. Another, Sara Watson, compliments the chancellor on her outfit. She asks: "Did you buy it for your first day of work today?" Black says no, it's not a new dress. A third student, Anna Incantalupo, shows Black a picture of her family. "And guess what, I'm the prettiest!" she says. 1:20: And now to Staten Island, the very last leg of this tour. Most reporters usually hop out of the press van after three or four schools, but Maura says a surprising number are sticking around for the bumpy ride. 1:00: Black visits a Korean language class, which all Democracy Prep students take. Andrew says that the school chose Korean because it's phonetic and has an alphabet (unlike Chinese and Japanese where there are thousands and thousands of characters) so it is actually possible to learn to read and write anything in Korean pretty quickly. Also, he figures it will give his students an advantage when they apply to college, as very few black and Latino students have studied Korean.